for larry

You can 1 extra credit point (1% of your total grade in this course) for attending one of the 50-minute sessions (and/or the keynote, which is 1 hour) and writing a one-page (single spaced, 1″ margins) essay on what you learned and how it relates to at least 3 of the topics we have covered in our class.  Each essay should be labeled with the workshop title and the course concepts you use must be underlined, defined, and you must show how it is related to the content from the workshop.

SESSION 1:  
  • Teaching Inclusiveness by Teaching Together
  • The intersection of food, race, and human trafficking
  • Whose Lives Really Matter? An Invitation for Students to Reconsider, Redefine, and Achieve Excellence in Higher Education
  • Person First Language: Our Words Impact EveryBODY
SESSION 2: 

  • American Anti-Catholicism of yesterday and the Islamophobia of Today
  • Education As A Human Right
  • The intersection of food, race, and human trafficking
  • Interrogating “Cultural Competency”
SESSION 3
  • Systemic Racism: Unseen and made visible
  • Oppression Hurts Everybody, But Not Equally
  • Jim Loewen “Sundown Towns”
  • The Uniformity of Oppression
SESSION 4

  • She’s Such A Slut! Analyzing our gendered language choices and their impact
  • How Do You Ally? Shifting the Narrative of Ally as Identity
  • How good is your English? The Power of Language Privilege
  • Creating Community through Reciprocity and Relationships: The Case of Kettering Circles
KEYNOTE BY JIM LOEWEN

Dr. Jim Loewen is a Sociologist who spent two years at the Smithsonian surveying twelve leading high school textbooks of American history only to find a disappointing blend of bland optimism, blind nationalism, and plain misinformation, weighing in at an average of 888 pages and almost five pounds. He also discovered that in many states most communities were “Sundown Towns” that kept out blacks (and sometimes other groups) for decades. Jim attended Carleton College, holds a Ph.D. in Sociology from Harvard University, and taught race relations for twenty years at the University of Vermont.