In each of these 6-page (or more) formal critical essays, you will be playing the role of a literary critic responding to the work of another literary critic. Your job is to pick a critical or theoret

DO YOU KNOW WHY YOUR FRIENDS ARE POSTING BETTER GRADES THAN YOU? — THEY ARE PROBABLY USING OUR WRITING SERVICES. Place your order and get a quality paper today. Take advantage of our current 15% discount by using the coupon code WELCOME15.


Order a Similar Paper Order a Different Paper

In each of these 6-page (or more) formal critical essays, you will be playing the role of a literary critic responding to the work of another literary critic. Your job is to pick a critical or theoretical text covered in  8-13 (for Essay 2), and to choose one of the following prompts [NOTE: For Essay 2, if you want to write about any of Val Vera’s poems or his book of poetry, that will “count” as your chosen text for the second half of the semester, even though it’s poetry and not criticism or theory. You would, however, have to include 1 or more pertinent critical or theoretical texts in disability studies or any other theoretical/critical discipline we’ve covered in the second half of the semester from outside or inside the syllabus (doesn’t matter which) to ground your argument about Vera’s poetry in a theoretical/critical context] :

1. Identify, explain, and defend a point of contention or difference (major or minor, as long as it’s interesting and productive for you and your reader) you have with any aspect of that critical or theoretical text’s argument, providing examples from inside and outside your chosen text to prove your point;

or

2. Qualify any aspect of that critical or theoretical text’s argument by taking it in a new direction via applying it creatively, thoughtfully, and critically to a written, cinematic, or cultural text of your choosing.

In each paragraph, be sure to quote directly and selectively from the text you’re critiquing, and to analyze those passages closely and creatively, with attention to detail and context. Avoid dwelling on points we’ve already covered in class, unless it’s a point that you made in class yourself. You may freely refer to any point already covered in class if you’re using it as a springboard to saying something new. Avoiding the obvious: With every point you make, be sure to move beyond “arguing” a point that, though true, should be obvious to any other intelligent reader in the class.  Good essays take the risk of introducing a counterintuitive or surprising argument that is somehow “new”; otherwise, it’s not worth stating at all.

Formatting: papers must be 6 pages or more, 1.5- or double-spaced, in a reasonable font (11 or 12-point Times New Roman, for instance), and with 1 inch margins all around,

Week 8, Writing critically about criticism & theory. Test Prep Session and Q&A

M, 3/7: Writing critically about criticism & theory (critical essay workshop and Q&A, no new reading); Test Prep Session and Q&A (no new reading)

Week 11, Post-Freudian Psychoanalytic Theory

M, 3/28: Winnicot, “Transitional Objects and Transitional Phenomenon, pp. 624-635; Hinrichsen, “Trauma Studies and the Literature of the US South,” pp 636-649; Lacan, “The Mirror Stage,” pp. 618-623

Week 12, New Historicism & Cultural Materialism

M, 4/4: Marx, pp. 717-735; Althusser, “Ideology and Ideological State Apparatuses,” pp. 768-777; Benjamin, “Theses on the Philosophy of History,” pp. 736-744; Montrose, “New Historicisms,” pp. 809-831

Week 13: Feminist Criticism, Gender Studies, & Queer Theory

M, 4/11: Rubin, “The Traffic in Women,” pp. 901-924; Rich, “Compulsory Heterosexuality and Lesbian Experience,” pp. 925-939; Butler, “Imitation and Gender Insubordination,” pp. 955-962; Berlant and Warner, “Sex in Public,” pp. 1034-1049

Week 14: Disability Studies

M, 4/18: Grue, “Ablenationalists Assemble”  Grue, Ablenationalists Assemble.pdf  Download Grue, Ablenationalists Assemble.pdf; Mollow, “Unvictamizable” Mollow, Unvictamizable.pdf  Download Mollow, Unvictamizable.pdf;Val Vera, poems from Crip Lyrics: “Chair Thing,” “Not Your Granddaddy’s Crip,” “Creation,” “Dark Side” (all aforementioned poems linked here:  Vera, selected poems from Crip Lyrics.pdf  Download Vera, selected poems from Crip Lyrics.pdf;

Do you require writing assistance from our best tutors to complete this or any other assignment? Please go ahead and place your order with us and enjoy amazing discounts.


Order a Similar Paper Order a Different Paper