RE: SOCW6103- Disocussion – Response to 2 Students (Wk6)

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Respond to at least two of your colleagues who chose a different way that addiction can impact the physical, emotional, and spiritual well being of a client. Offer your thoughts and views on these differences. (Use sub-heading for response, Use required course reading I supplied from original post)

Response to Kristie

Post an explanation of two ways addiction impacts the physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being of clients with problems with addiction.

According to Capuzzi and Stauffer (2016), addiction is a complex and progressive behavior pattern with biological, psychological, sociological, and behavioral components. Identifying a relationship between disorders and stressors and understanding the dynamics of chemical addiction is a challenge. Substance abuse or drug withdrawal can cause psychiatric symptoms, mimic DSM disorders, worsen the severity, or mask symptoms of a disorder (Galanter, 2006). Long-term use causes brain dysfunction that disorganizes personality and can create social and occupational problems (Capuzzi & Stauffer, 2016). Some clients have difficulty overcoming negative moods, and find that feelings of boredom, depression, loneliness, unhappiness, anger, anxiety, shame, and guilt, as well as painful memories, are barriers to treatment and precursors to relapse (Capuzzi & Stauffer, 2016). Consideration of spirituality to overcoming stigmatization and its negative impacts on the addicted individual is shown to be effective approach modality (Galanter, 2006). Therefore, attention to each of the multiple systems is needed as they interact both in the development and addictive behaviors and in their treatment (Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 2007).

Explain how gender might influence the physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being of clients with problems with addiction.

The social construct of the definition of gender and the roles that identity entails has underrepresented women in addiction research and treatment approaches (Capuzzi & Stauffer, 2016). Historically, studies have failed to recognize the impact of trauma and its pervasiveness on women (Capuzzi & Stauffer, 2016). “Moreover, the addicted women were found to have been abused sexually, physically, and emotionally by more perpetrators, more frequently, and for longer periods of time than their non-addicted counterparts. The addicted women also reported more incidents of incest and rape” (Covington & Kohen, 1984, p. 42). Additionally, differences in body weight, metabolisms, and hormones are determinants on how drugs interact within the bodies of different sexes (Capuzzi & Stauffer, 2016). Research indicates quicker addiction and significant negative health consequences for addicted women (Capuzzi & Stauffer, 2016). According to Gordon (2002), women are affected emotionally before addiction while men experience addiction prior to affective disorders (as cited by Capuzzi & Stauffer, 2016). Responsive addiction counseling understands the values and spiritual influences of women in a dominant male society and is sensitive to their unique needs from this perspective (Capuzzi & Stauffer, 2016). Notable men and transgendered suffer addiction issues differently as well, and a competent clinician must acknowledge and evaluate treatment accordingly (Capuzzi & Stauffer, 2016).

References

Capuzzi, D., & Stauffer, M. D. (2016). Foundations of addictions counseling (3rd ed.).

New York, NY: Pearson Education, Inc.

Covington. S., & Kohen, J. (1984). Women, alcohol, and sexuality. Advances in Alcohol

and Substance Abuse, 4(1), 41-56.

Galanter, M. (2006). Spirituality and addiction: A research and clinical perspective. The

American Journal on Addictions, 15(4), 286–292.

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. (2007). Spirituality has a role in substance abuse

treatment programs, Maryland researchers say. Retrieved from:

http://www.rwjf.org/en/library/research/2007/12/spirituality-has-a-role-in-substance-

abuse-treatment-programs–m.html.

Response to Uchechi

Addiction poses a series of negative consequences on a person’s well-being, physical health, emotional and spiritual. Most substances will cause strain on the organs, as well as the respiratory system when a client has used drugs for prolonged use. Part of being brain are affected by prolonged drug usage which causes neurological impairment (Capuzzi, & Stauffer, 2016). Also, the rise in mental health could be associated with prolonged use of a drug. This brings me to the emotional aspect of addiction as the ultimate consequence of drug use is death but aside from that many struggles with depression, anxiety, memory loss and paranoia (Capuzzi, & Stauffer, 2016). When our brain is repetitively exposed to drugs, our brain could become less responsive to those things that are natural pleasuring which could cause a person to become flat with their emotional and become depressed. Due to neurological impairment, client struggling with addiction will sometime become paranoid.

Depending on the substance use males are more likely to develop a substance use disorder while this may narrow when it comes to alcohol use. Women are more likely to express intoxicating with alcohol use. According to Capuzzi & Stauffer (2016), “woman drugs of abuse and dependence were more often prescribed, and it is estimated that 6.5% of women aged 12 years and older abuse illicit drugs, and 47.1% of women aged 12 and older identify as “current drinkers” of alcohol.” But in united states, Men continue to be the primary consumers and abusers of alcohol and other drugs. (Capuzzi, & Stauffer, 2016 p. 409). Depending on gender, some drugs choices affect their brains differently. Different substance effects each gender differently due to our genetic makeup. Women metabolize alcohol and drugs differently than men (Capuzzi, & Stauffer, 2016). Women are likely to become intoxicated after one and a half drink than men (Capuzzi, & Stauffer, 2016).

References

Capuzzi, D., & Stauffer, M. D. (2016). Foundations of addictions counseling (3rd ed.).

New York, NY: Pearson Education, Inc.

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My references

Capuzzi, D., & Stauffer, M. D. (2016). Foundations of addictions counseling (3rd ed.). New

York, NY: Pearson Education, Inc.

Galanter, M. (2006). Spirituality and addiction: A research and clinical perspective. The

American Journal on Addictions, 15(4), 286–292.

O’Neil, A. & Lucas, J. (2015). Promoting a Gender Responsive Approach to Addiction. Rome:

UNICRI Publication

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